Meditations of Innate Love & Wisdom

Meditations of Innate Love & Wisdom

Love here is the power to commune with persons in the goodness of their being, while wishing them deeply well. Your benefactors are those who have quietly extended such love to you, often in little moments long forgotten. A benefactor moment is a moment you can recall when someone was with you in a simple loving way, taking joy in you, in a moment of play, laughter, care, deep listening to you, or quiet caring presence.

Meditations of Sustainable Compassion and Wisdom

Meditations of Sustainable Compassion and Wisdom

Practice the meditations of “Innate Love and Wisdom” for some months before taking up these meditations regularly. Recall the meaning of love – loving care senses beings in their unconditional worth and wishes them deeply well. Recall the meaning of compassion – the power of loving care for persons that empathizes with them in their sufferings and wishes them deeply free from the suffering so they can be deeply well.

Meditation of Offering Practice

Meditation of Offering Practice

This meditation, adapted from the mandala offering ritual of Tibetan Buddhism, provides a profound way to communicate with your Buddha nature. Imaging your Buddha nature before you as the Buddha provides a symbolic way to offer yourself completely to your deepest nature and become more receptive to its qualities—all-pervasive love, compassion, openness and wisdom.

Accessing Our Best Inner Resources for Social Service & Action

Accessing Our Best Inner Resources for Social Service & Action

Content: The meditation training in these retreats and workshops is for all who serve others, whether professionally or in home or community—such as teachers, parents, counselors, social workers, therapists, pastors, health-care providers, hospice workers, community organizers, and volunteers. In these workshops, participants are guided into powerful meditations of compassionate connection and wisdom that have been adapted from the natural ease tradition of Tibet in newly accessible ways for people of all backgrounds and faiths.

How Contemporary Buddhist Practice Meets the Secular World in Its Search for a Deeper Grounding for Service and Social Action

How Contemporary Buddhist Practice Meets the Secular World in Its Search for a Deeper Grounding for Service and Social Action

Many people today who are deeply concerned about the world’s suffering inhabit a secularized worldview in which it is assumed that religious understandings of salvation or spiritual liberation are irrelevant to the material needs and ways of thinking prevalent in our time.